Angus Carlyle

Marshland (Helicotrema Mix)
8’09”
2017

angus

Photo by Chiara Caterina

The sounds that comprise “Marshland (Helicotrema Mix)” were all recorded on the Dengie Peninsula, an area of tidal mud-flats and salt marshes that lies between the estuaries of the rivers Blackwater and Crouch. Microphones were submerged beneath the rising tide, held above retreating waves, wedged into a decaying wooden watch-tower buffeted by strong winds and lowered through the gun slits of a pill-box, where nesting swifts called to fledglings and flew in and out the Second World War concrete structure’s openings. Though left raw and unprocessed, the sounds have been layered in a series of movements between interiors and exteriors, between what passes over and what happens underneath. This Essex coast once formed part of what archaeologists have named ‘Doggerland,’ a mesolithic land bridge which joined Britain to continental Europe, and the recordings were made during fieldwork for a film project with Chiara Caterina in the weeks before the UK population voted on the referendum to leave the European Union.


Bio:
Angus Carlyle is a researcher at CRiSAP at the University of the Arts, London, where he is Professor of Sound and Landscape.  He edited the book Autumn Leaves (2007), co-edited On Listening (2013), co-wrote In The Field (2013) and authored the monograph A Downland Index(2016), an exercise in nature writing on the move. His art works have included 51° 32 ‘ 6.954” N / 0° 00 ‘ 47.0808” W (2008), Noli Me Tangere (2009), Some Memories of Bamboo (2009) and Air Pressure (2011 – 2013), a collaboration with anthropologist Rupert Cox. His new project with Cox,Zawawa (2015 – ) extends Carlyle’s fascination with the heard world of people and place, memory and presence.

www.anguscarlyle.com